Japan 2016 Travel Log 08: Kurama & Kibune

TRAVEL PHOTO-LOG 08
Kurama & Kibune, KANSAI, JAPAN

Yuji-jinja shrine

 

 

There’s the Tengu

 

 

And then there’s us.

 

 

 

 

commemorating the start of our hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More tengu

 

 

Almost mythical

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View from the top

 

 

kurama-dera

 

 

When you feel like dying but there’s only one way out

 

 

Reached the peak. yay.

 

 

 

 

these sticks are lifesavers

 

 

/insert motivational quote

 

 

 

 

Salvation – Hirobun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kawadoko dining time

 

 

 

 

Being overly bloated we decided to walk

 

 

 

 

 

all by myself~

 

 


Thanks for viewing!

Not your usual tourist spot, Kurama and Kibune usually caters to japanese pilgrims or shinto enthusiast. Don’t really see much foreign tourists in this area. It was a nice change because we were getting kinda claustrophobic in Kyoto with the sheer multitude of fellow gaijins milling about.

Wear mountain hiking shoes because the climb is arduous, and this commemorated the second time my nikes screamed abuse at me. We thought we’d seen it all at Noboribetsu but Kurama tops it all and more. Starting from Kurama, you’ll enter through the jinja and pay a quick token admission fee. Then begins your spartan exercise regime by Kurama-dera. The saving grace was that they loaned you walking sticks – which stank but came in pretty handy.

After conquering the mountains, you’ll find yourself at Kibune, where a multitude of Kawado (Waterfall top) restaurants are. We headed to the best in the area – Hirobun – and in a moment of stupidity we accidentally signed ourselves up for some nagashi somen. You’re just gonna be paying for the experience; the somen were fresh, but overall it wasn’t really worth it. Especially if you’re left-handed (like I am), I wouldn’t recommend it. Hirobun sadly was fully booked so we headed downstream for alternative kawadoko restaurants.

September was just the correct season for Kawadoko. The restaurants fold up the tatami mats in October for winter, and won’t open them again till summer. Likewise for kawadoko dining you’re mostly paying for the experience. The food was good – borderline exotic but nothing we couldn’t stomach – and they serve you in a couple of courses. Truthfully for the price you pay for a kawadoko meal, it would’ve been better if you’d topped it up and got yourself a nice ryokan BnB stay for the day.

You’d still be sent of awfully bloated – and we didn’t even finish the carbs – and in another moment of stupidity (food coma maybe) we decided to forsake the bus stop and simply walked towards the train station. Guys and girls reading this – DO NOT do this if you’re not the walking kind of person. It was a really long walk. Long and lonely. On the plus you’d hatch loads of pokego eggs. Speaking of pokego, we conquered a gym on the top of Kurama-dera, and my Gyarados survived there for roughly a day or so. Highly recommend taking down gyms in this area.

 

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